Major UK Supermarket To Start Giving Poor People Bugs

(NewsGlobal.com)- The budget supermarket chain Aldi just might be adding edible insect recipe kits to its shelves as a cheap and sustainable form of protein.

The supermarket will be choosing one of several new company products for its store shelves including products from Yum Bug which makes the insect recipe kits.

Yum Bug founders Aaron Thomas and Leo Taylor have been competing with other start-up companies on the BBC’s “Aldi’s Next Big Thing.” The products for each company are presented to Julie Ashfield, Managing Director of Buying for Aldi UK who will weigh the products and select two finalists. The winning company will appear as a SpecialBuy in Aldi’s 970 UK supermarkets.

Yum Bug’s Aaron Thomas described his company’s mission as changing perceptions about using insects as food. He described bugs as “the most sustainable protein sources in the world.”

Thomas noted that crickets are nearly 70 percent protein which is 3 times the protein of beef. Plus, crickets are high in iron and have more calcium than milk.

There’s more iron in a skillet, but nobody wants to eat one.

Thomas explained that Yum Bug wants to “take bug consumption mainstream.”

How about not?

He believes if they can get their products on the shelves of Aldi, “that would be an amazing opportunity.”

Not if nobody buys it.

Yum Bug’s Leo Taylor said he and Aaron Thomas have been cooking with bugs for years. In 2017, they began experimenting with insect recipes in Taylor’s parents’ garage. When they landed on what they considered an edible recipe, they would then post it online. But it was the COVID lockdowns that really got their business booming. Taylor said they sold the first recipe boxes during the lockdown and “everything snowballed.”

Aldi holds the competition as part of its commitment to provide locally-sourced products. The budget supermarket chain pledged to prioritize home-grown suppliers as it works to spend an additional £3.5 billion a year with UK businesses by the end of 2025.